Ultimate Guide to the Fairy Pools, Noosa

You’ve planned a trip to Noosa, which is one of Queensland’s most popular beachside towns located on the Sunshine Coast. If there is one thing you should see while you’re up there, it is, of course, the Fairy Pools.

What are the Fairy Pools?

The Fairy Pools are two natural tidal pools near Noosa. The pools are best enjoyed at low tide when the pools are calm and absolutely spectacular (as the waves aren’t crashing into them creating ripples on the surface). If the timing doesn’t work out, it’s still worth the trip, it feels like a bit of an adventure getting to the pools (eve though it’s relatively easy) and whilst the lower pool may not be visible at high tide, depending on the swell, the higher pool may still be enjoyed for a quick dip while you enjoy the ocean views.

Tip: We’ve seen a couple of people have a quick snorkel to investigate the sponges and fish which inhabit the pools and they said it was absolutely worth it. The disclaimer to this is that we’ve not snorkeled here ourselves!

Where are they located?

Tucked away along the coast of Noosa National Park, you will come across the Fairy Pools. But, you really need to know where they are or you can very easily miss them, as I said before, it feels like a bit of an adventure when you first visit.

Continue reading for step by step instructions on how to find the Fairy Pools.

When to visit the Fairy Pools

To avoid sharing this beautiful spot with a million other people, sharing slippery rocks and trying to get that cool photo, only you have a Fairy Pool filled with other people trying to achieve the same outcome, it is important to visit at just the right time.

Step 1: If you can avoid weekends and school holidays then that is going to go in your favour. If you can’t, and we couldn’t avoid a weekend then follow Step 2 and Step 3. I would even recommend a winter visit, as the beaches are usually far more quiet in the winter months!

Step 2: Check out the tide times. If you don’t take anything from this post except this piece of advice, then you will manage just fine. You NEED to visit the pools on low tide to actually see both of the pools and enjoy them for what they are. You may still be able to enjoy the larger pool on high tide, provided the swell is minimal and the water is calm.

Step 3: Get there early! If there is a low tide early in the morning, wake up and get there! This will be your only chance to enjoy these beautiful natural rock pools on your own or with very few people.

Best spot to park?

If you’re lucky, you can park right at the entrance to the Noosa National Park walkway, but parking is extremely limited and if there is a traffic jam getting in and out it could waste precious time trying to get to the pools at the right time!

We parked at the Lions Carpark just off Noosa Parade, but be careful as there is a maximum time you can park there and yes, they do chalk your tyres!!! So keep an eye on the time and make sure you’re back with enough time to shift your car.

Getting to the Fairy Pools

The Fairy Pools are accessed by a little bit of easy rock scrambling – There is also no clear signage as to where you have to go, so if you’re lucky enough not to be visiting when everyone else is, you won’t have anyone to follow so take note of these directions.

If you’re starting your walk from Noosa’s main beach, at the end of the beach you will see the start of the boardwalk which is the start of the coastal track. The start of the walk will take you past First Point and Little Cove and you will then reach the Noosa National Park Carpark.

When you continue your walk, you will notices changes in the track, a little more rocky, dirt and sandy.

Be sure to keep an eye on the time to make sure you get there in time to see the pools at their best. You can always stop in at the beautiful beaches along the way, on the way back.

As you continue to walk the coastal track, keep note of where you are up to and try not to get too distracted by what’s around you!

You will need to exit the path, at the lookout on the point at the far eastern end of Granite Bay which is AFTER you have passed both Winch Cove and Picnic Cove. But if you have walked to the big bend in the track then you have gone too far.

If you keep an eye out for a picnic bench seat a couple hundred metres away from the Picnic Cove sign, that is a good indication of where to turn off.

Click here for the Noosa National Park headland walking tracks.

The walk itself will take around 30 – 40 minutes from Little Cove Car Park. For the most part, there are well-maintained tracks for you to follow and a little incline in parts. You only need to negotiate the scrambling of rocks to get to the pools at the end.

You can continue walking afterwards towards Hell’s Gate.

Here is a short video of our Noosa National Park trip! Remember to put it on HD 1080p.

Facilities near the Fairy Pools

You’re in a national park, so there are no facilities near the Fairy Pools. I would suggest visiting the toilet block behind Tea Tree Bay before you continue on with the walk. These are the closest facilities.

What to take with you

We recommend bringing a few essentials with you, as you will be gone for a couple of hours!

  • Backpack
  • Hat
  • Sunglasses
  • Sunscreen
  • Water
  • Snacks
  • Beach Towel
  • Sneakers for the walk
  • Thongs for afterwards at the beach
  • Goggles if you want to try and snorkel
  • A camera of course!

Where to stay in Noosa

We recommend staying at the Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort. Watch this space for our full review of the hotel and our reasons for recommending you stay here!

Other things to do on the Sunshine Coast

If you have a bit of time on the Sunshine Coast, there is plenty to see and do. We can recommend a few things, such as:

Mount Coolum National Park and lookout: Click here to find out more.

Strawberry Picking: Click here to find out more.

Mooloolaba Beach: Watch this space! Blog post coming soon.

Have you visited the Fairy Pools? What did you think? Leave your comments below.

“Man cannot discover new oceans unless he has the courage to lose sight of the shore.” – Andre Gide

 

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